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After an evening acclimatising to the MV Cape Race, our 116-foot Canadian-built expedition vessel, we awoke on Day Two to a calm bay north of Nain, which was perfect for practicing and testing our diver propulsion vehicles (DPVs) or our snazzy underwater scooters. Hot pink, rich red, glossy grey, broken black and bright blue, each has a unique personality and mind of her own.

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Today we visited the now deserted outpost of Hebron. For 60 to 70 years, Hebron was a missionary outpost of the German Moravian church. In the 1950s, the government of Newfoundland and Labrador forcefully relocated the Inuit living at Hebron, and the mission was abandoned. Today, several plaques mark this forced relocation event, including an official apology from the government of Newfoundland and Labrador, a list of those displaced, and, the most touching— an acceptance of the apology by Inuit leaders.

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Like many coastal communities around the world, the wharf in Nain is a place of gathering for many people. From families fishing for their evening meal of char to children playing games or locals receiving goods off a supply ship, there’s always some kind of action down at the dock. The weekend of July 12-13 brought a whole new buzz down to the wharf in the community of Nain with the arrival of Team Sedna and our educational outreach programs.

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Ruby Banwait our Chief Scientist has brought along mini-aquariums that can be set up at locations along our route. At each community we fill the aquariums with sea water and then go on a collecting dive, bringing back a variety of animals for a short vacation in our tank. The tanks are set up so that one is at eye level for small kids and another is easy to reach into. We show the kids how to gently hold some of the critters and teach them about how they eat and feed. We also share messages about keeping the ocean clean and protecting the habitat for sea life. Ruby is also teaching the team the fun stories we can share to inspire, gross out, and engage the children.

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We had another incredibly rewarding day with the community. We caught a fresh batch of animals from the public wharf. Many people turned up to watch us dive and were prepared to stock up the tanks when we emerged from the water. We also brought home a transom cover that had been lost by a local boater some time ago. He asked us to pick it up for him and was relieved to have his boat part back. I think it had been in the water for a while, because I had to scrape off some resident anemones and other animals before returning it to him.

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The next stage of our journey begins. We leave Nain, Labrador on the MV Cape Race and head north. The experience here in Nain has been incredible. I think all of us would agree that it exceeded our wildest imaginations. We wanted to tread very lightly and not make any assumptions about storming in with education for the community. Our fears were alleviated immediately. Everyone was eager to learn more about what we were doing. The community gathers around the pier to fish and hang out.

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The 2014‐2016 Sedna Epic Expedition departs Nain on Monday, July 14, to commence a multi-faceted and ambitious arctic expedition, which combines scientific ocean research and educational outreach to Inuit communities with a special focus on empowering women and girls.

The Sedna Epic Expedition involves extreme physical challenges associated with snorkeling— with the aid of dry suits and diver propulsion vehicles—in arctic waters with pack ice and icebergs.

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